NameCharles John STEVENS , GGG Grandfather
Birth16 Aug 1857, Clerkenwell, London367
Birth Memoca 1857 according to marriage record ADE 141/795
Immigration30 Aug 1876, ‘Glen Osmond’367 Age: 19
Death10 Feb 1917, Enfield, SA368,369,370,371 Age: 59
BurialEnfield, SA367
Residence1861, Southwark St George, Surrey372 Age: 3
Residence1871, Bermondsey, Surrey373 Age: 13
OccupationSub-Editor Of The Adelaide Register
FatherJohn STEVENS (ca1832-1894)
MotherCaroline LOVEDAY (ca1830-1896)
Obituary
The Register (Adelaide, SA) Monday 12 February 1917370

LATE MR. C. J. STEVENS.
Life of Useful Achievement.
The death of Mr. Charles John Stevens,
which occurred on Saturday morning at his
residence at Collins, street, Enfield, bas
closed the career of a highly capable
Journalist, who for many years did much
to mould public thought, and who person
ally was one of tbe kindliest and most
estimable of men. Mr. Stevens was con
nected with The Register and its associa-
ted journals for 35 years prior to the onset
of the illness which compelled his all-too-
early retirement, and eventually resulted
in bis death. He was born at

(image)
THE LATE MR C. J. STEVENS

Clerkenwell, London, on August 16, 1857,
and was educated at the Herald's School,
South-East London. Hie first business ex-
perience was gained in a barrister's and
accountant's office in the metropolis. He
came to South Australia in the ship Glen
Osmond, which arrived at Port Adelaide
on September 4, 1875. A month later Mr.
Stevens joined the staff of The Register.
After a period of literary service he
was appointed manager of the Port Ade-
laide branch in May, 1877, and during his
nine years' stay there was actively connec-
ted with many of the public movements of
the town. He left Port Adelaide in
December, 1886, to take the position of
sub-editor of The Journal and The Regis-
ter. Six years later he became leader of
The Register reporting staff, a position in
which he rendered invaluable service to
his employers while maintaining the
highest traditions of the paper in main-
taining the happiest relations with the
staff, and encouraging that esprit de corps
which has always distinguished its mem-
bers. In June, 1809, Mr. Stevens was ap-
pointed associate editor. In that capacity
be manifested a ready grasp of the funda-
mentals of the various subjects with which
be was called upon to deal; and. although
be was a deep reader and a profound stu-
dent, he clothed his thoughts in a dear
and easy diction. Among Mr. Stevens's
literary efforts prior to hie engagement on
the editorial staff, was the production of
the first published work upon the Broken
Hill mining fields the result of his obser-
vations during a visit to the district in
1888, before the coach and the candle bad
riven way to the railway and the electric
light. Early in 1910 Mr. Stevens found
that his physical strength was no longer
equal to the satisfactory performance of his
duties, and in July of that year the office
had regretfully to accept bis resignation.
At various times, however, as his strength
permitted, he contributed articles to the
press on a diversity of subject*; but mainly
spent his later years in simple rural diver-
sions.
—Prominent Freemason.—
For 32 years Mr. Stevens was con-
nected with Freemasonry in South Aus-
tralia, during 20 of .which he was a member
of Commercial Lodge, No. 39. S.A.C. In
1014 he was the Worshipful Master of that
Lodge, and in the same year was elected
Grand Steward of the Grand Lodge of South
Australia. In 1915 be was appointed Pre-
sident of the Masters and Wardens' Asso-
ciation, an office which he held for a year.
He was noted for his profound addresses
at the festive board at special functions,
and for the high ideals which he preached
and faithfully practiced. He was rightly
regarded as a trustworthy authority on the
history, aims, and functions of Free
masonry, and his lectures on matters con-
nected with the craft were always heard
and read with (great interest, and usually
evoked much discussion. In responding
on the occasion of his retirement from the
chair of the Commercial Lodge, in Novem-
ber, 1914, Mr. Stevens remarked that he
had had commercial experience, and con-
sequently had some affinity with commer-
cial men: still, he loved journalism, which
was a noble vocation for a man with a
message. His announcement that in that
month he and his wife had celebrated the
thirtieth anniversary of their wedding found
a happy sequel in the toast, “Thirty happy
years and many happy returns of the day."
About a year ago the deceased gentleman’s
longstanding illness assumed a definite and
painful form, and he spent some time in
hospital. Early in December, 1916, lie was
operated upon, mid the operation disclosed
a malignant malady which brought to its
ending a life full of meritorious conduct
and useful achievement.
—The Family.—
Mr. Stevens has left a widow— his second
wife— a daughter (Miss G. I. Stevens), six
sons (Messers. J. C. and B. E., of Angle
Vale; the Rev. A. C. of Victor Harbour;
Lieut. V. L., of the A.I.F., a journal-
ist, who began work in The Register
office; and E. L. and D. L. (of Enfield]
and 8 grandchildren.

AN APPRECIATION

The following telegram was received
on Sunday from the Editor of The
Register who is in Melbourne:— 'Al-
though it was merciful in the circum-
stances, I deeply regret the withdrawal
from mortal life of Charles John Stevens,
my oldest literary friend, who. when he
retired, had been connected with The
Register much longer than any of his col-
leagues, and whose lofty ideals and finely
consistent practical example were an in-
spiration to all with whom he was associated. - Will J. Sowden

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 12 February 1917371

Mr. Charles John Stevens, who on Satur-
day morning died at Enfield, where for
some years past he had resided, was for
many years a well-known figure in Ade-
laide journalistic circles. He was a
native of London, and received his educa-
tion at the Heralds' School, South-east
London. For some years he was associated
with a legal firm, and it was not until he
came to this State in September, 1875, at
the age of l8, that he took up newspaper
work, a calling which he found congenial in
all its branches. His connection with the  
"Register" lasted for 35 years, during
which period he filled many positions, in-
cluding that of associate editor. Mr.
Stevens bad many interests outside his
daily occupation. As a Freemason of
many years' standing he was raised to the
position of Worshipful Master of the Com-
mercial Lodge, No. 39, S.A.C., in 1914,
and he also filled the honorable post of
Grand Steward of the Grand Lodge of
South Australia. Six years later he was
made president of the Masters' War-
den's Association. At one period of his
life Mr. Stevens was associated with the
Methodist Church, and later with the
Congregational body. He was a graceful
and fluent speaker, a man of wide reading,
and a student of current events. Al-
though as the result of failing health he
retired from active connection with the
daily press about seven years ago, his pen
had since been employed occasionally in
literary work. He left a widow, six sons,
one of whom is the Rev. A. C. Stevens
(pastor of the Congregational Church at
Victor Harbor) and one daughter. There  
are eight grandchildren.
Spouses
1Elizabeth BRANDWOOD , Step GGG Grandmother
Birthca 1853
Death5 Apr 1883, Semaphore, SA367,374 Age: 30
Death Memodied in childbirth (Alice Maud Stacy?)
BurialWest Terrace Cemetery, Adelaide, SA367
FatherHenry BRANDWOOD (ca1828-1885)
MotherMary Ann SAUNDERS (ca1830-1913)
Marriage25 May 1878, Residence Of Bride, Unley, SA367,375,376
2Julia RASHLEIGH , GGG Grandmother
Birth24 Jun 1863, Mitcham, SA377,367
Death16 May 1945, Prospect, SA367,378,379 Age: 81
FatherWilliam Richards RASHLEIGH (ca1827-1912)
MotherElizabeth Augusta SCOTT (ca1837-1897)
Marriage8 Nov 1884, Draper Memorial Church, Adelaide, SA380,381
ChildrenJulian Charles (1885-1957)
 Bernard Emerson (1887-1961)
 Aubrey Clement (1889-1957)
 Vivian Leigh (1892-1969)
 Edgar Loveday (1896-1973)
 Gladys Irene (1901-1980)
 Donald Leslie (1903-1953)
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